The Keto Diet and Bone Broth – Why You Should Drink It

Should Drink It

Bone broth has climbed the ranks in recent years and has truly established itself as a superfood which many diets, including the ketogenic diet, have happily embraced. Sure, you might have had chicken broth before, but maybe not bone broth.

So what is it, exactly? As its name suggests, bone broth is made from connective tissue and animal bones—typically cattle, chicken, or fish— that have been boiled into a broth and simmered for hours with vegetables, herbs, and spices.

Why Bone Broth?

Bone broth has long been an essential keto-friendly food that can really boost a meal’s flavor while also providing healthy minerals and gelatine.

Fight the Keto Flu

Drinking bone broth is an excellent source of electrolytes (such as magnesium, sodium, and potassium) your body needs on a low-carb diet, and can help get rid of the common and unpleasant “keto flu” symptoms.

A lot of keto-dieters consider this power food as the ultimate keto flu remedy. Rather than opting for carb-filled chicken noodle soup which can be high in MSG and other nasty additives, bone broth is a great way to sneak that extra water into your diet.

Natural Body Detoxification

When first switching to the ketogenic diet, you’ll more than likely notice yourself eating much more animal fat and proteins than you may have previously been used to. While these are great sources for nutrients, a common concern is over-consuming methionine.

Methionine is an amino acid found in animal protein sources like fish, chicken, beef, and egg whites. It can be a good thing by acting as an antioxidant and helping our bodies metabolize the food we eat, but it can also be a bad thing if consumed too much.

Too much methionine can build up in the blood and lead to liver damage, muscle weakness, and even neurological issues[1]. Enter: bone broth, a food that can easily balance the methionine in your body.

Bone broth is packed with the amino acid glycine which has been shown to help our bodies get rid of excess methionine and thus prevent unwanted build up. By regularly consuming bone broth, especially on a low-carb and high-fat diet like the keto diet, you will help eliminate that unneeded and superfluous methionine.

Maintain a Healthy Electrolyte Balance

As already mentioned earlier, bone broth helps supply your body with much-needed electrolytes. You may be wondering why this is so important on the ketogenic diet, and the answer is that when you cut out carbs, this means you’re cutting out most starchy vegetables and fruits. These are the biggest sources of electrolytes that your body needs to function properly.

While there are keto-friendly foods that contain electrolytes, such as avocado, berries, and leafy greens, you have to be careful you don’t end up with an electrolyte imbalance, which has been shown to lead to fatigue, dizziness, and cognitive symptoms like confusion[2].

Introducing 1-2 cups of bone broth to your keto diet is a great way to keep your electrolytes in check. How much exactly you should be drinking each day depends on a few factors, such as your individual macronutrient requirements and the other carbs, fats, and proteins you eat in a day.

Since bone broth is so low in carbs, most people are fine drinking a few cups a day without compromising ketosis.

Best Ways to Enjoy Bone Broth

While you can certainly enjoy bone broth the good ‘ol fashioned way, don’t be afraid to get creative! Try adding it to your meals in the following ways to keep you from getting bored with it:

Scrambled Eggs — Bone broth is a great way to add a fluffy texture to your scrambled eggs, similar to not-so-keto-friendly foods like milk and cream. It can also add a much more savory and delicious taste. Unlike dairy products that are known to cause inflammation when consumed in excess, bone broth actually comes with anti-inflammatory nutrients.

Smoothie — You can make a tasty and healthy smoothie these days with just about anything, and bone broth is no exception! Believe it or not, but bone broth blends nicely with other keto-friendly foods like berries, avocado, leafy greens, and lime to make for a refreshing and therapeutic smoothie.

Sauté Your Veggies — Start sauteeing your keto-friendly veggies in 1/2 a cup of bone broth for a nice boost in both flavor and nutrients.

Nix the Coffee — This one is usually harder to sell, but try trading in your morning coffee for bone broth. The nutrients in it will surprise you with all-day energy without the crash, and can also help you stay focused when first starting out on your keto journey.

Some additional reasons why bone broth is good for you:

  • Rich in other important minerals, such as phosphorus and calcium
  • Rich in collagen and gelatin which help keep your bones, tendons, ligaments, and joints healthy
  • Helps with leaky gut[3]
  • Helps fight infections
  • Strengthens hair and nails
  • Helps with muscle repair
  • Reduces inflammation (which is considered the primary cause of heart disease)
  • Great for adrenal fatigue tissues and thyroid health

As you can tell, bone broth is a powerhouse when it comes to therapeutic and beneficial foods on and off the ketogenic diet.

If it’s completely new to you, begin incorporating into your diet on a regular basis to start seeing is wondrous effects like glowing skin, increased digestive health, stronger bones, and so much more.

More Readings:

How to Avoid Dehydration and Electrolyte Imbalances on Keto

How to Use the Keto Diet for Weight Loss – The complete Guide

References:

[1] Harvey Mudd S, Braverman N, Pomper M, Tezcan K, Kronick J, Jayakar P, Garganta C, Ampola MG, Levy HL, McCandless SE, Wiltse H, Stabler SP, Allen RH, Wagner C, Borschel MW. Infantile hypermethioninemia and hyperhomocysteinemia due to high methionine intake: a diagnostic trap. Mol Genet Metab. 2003 May;79(1):6-16.

[2] Balc AK, Koksal O, Kose A, Armagan E, Ozdemir F, Inal T, Oner N. General characteristics of patients with electrolyte imbalance admitted to emergency department. World J Emerg Med. 2013;4(2):113–116. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

[3] Rapin JR, Wiernsperger N (2010) Possible links between intestinal permeability and food processing: A potential therapeutic niche for glutamine. Clinics (Sao Paulo) 65: 635–643 [PMC free article] [PubMed]

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Jessica Cotzin is a freelance writer, web developer, and avid traveler. Born and raised in South Florida, she graduated with a Bachelor’s Degree in Multi-Media Journalism from Florida Atlantic University and currently resides in Miami Beach. Her passions lie in reading great literature and traveling the world, bumping blindly into new adventures.

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